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Thread: Future of Energy

  1. #11
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    Thanks for the input, zion. I'm going to just deal with the energy grid and maybe incorporate Tesla's ideas into my speech (if it makes sense). Everyone does the "global warming" and "gas-guzzler" angle so I think energy grids can be something different and unusual yet very important.

    Will post whatever I find on that. For curious lurkers, look at the 2003 Northeast blackout.

  2. #12
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    Edit: Adding a welcome message.

    Welcome to the forum and thanks for the input.

    I really think that unless people see a $300 power bill, they wouldn't care to fix anything. Especially since these issues are slow and there's always something more immediate to be dealt with. It could also be because that everything about power sidetracks. "Let's get green energy! Buy more organic cotton!"

    In other news:
    The DoE was building Yucca Mountain for nuclear waste storage but they seem to be scrapping that project now. Looking at how nuclear fuel rods are transported in these virtually indestructible caskets, there's no way for it to leak or cause damage along the way. Could've been the spark for nuclear energy.

    The East Coast seems to embrace nuclear energy; a lot of plants up and down the entire coast. But I think with the Chernobyl and Three Mile incidents, that negative image of nuclear reactors will be in the thoughts of consumers and producers.

    Homer Simpson doesn't help either.
    Last edited by bebop; 03-25-2010 at 08:00 AM.

  3. #13
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    On the presentation: some difficult words and I didn't persuade so well. Fell apart at the end and the flow of things was convoluted from the beginning. Oh well, life goes on.

    But besides that, I'll post the information I put out there:

    1. 2003 Blackout - in 9 seconds, 55 million people (45mil in US, 10mil in Ontario, CA) were left without power
    2. Current grid is from the 1960s, yet it still manages 200,000 miles of power lines and 10,000+ power plants.
    3. Annual repair and power outages cost 25-180 billion (2003 outage cost 100bil to fix)
    4. Current main sources: oil, natural gas, coal. All fossil fuels, greenhouse gas-emitters, and expecting a 2% annual price increase from now until 2035.
    5. 8% total energy is renewable; hydroelectricity accounts for 6%
    6. Estimated cost for new mile of power-lines: $8 million (Europe spending $650bil on their overhaul)

    And people think healthcare is expensive.

  4. #14
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    Sorry to hear that man..

    Don't wanna sound dark and evil, but I had a feeling you wouldn't do well with persuading.

    The reason is purely psychological, taking into account what the audience thinks about every day, their age, surrounding, friends etc etc, it's really no wonder that they didn't approach the issue seriously. I know I wouldn't when I was around 18.

    Even if someone does take it seriously, it will wear off in days at best, perhaps even hours. The one single absolute truth always remains - man is his own worst enemy. We're born into the world shaped by people who don't care, and of course we all adapt to it, and make not caring a normal part of our lives and state of mind. Also the "drowning in the masses" effect is among the worst traits of humans. "Sure sure, like I'm gonna save the world. There are groups devoted to that, I don't need to do anything" is what just about anyone is gonna say. And the world today is the result of 6 billion people thinking exactly that. It's pretty defeating and depressing, even agitating in my case. I sometimes feel like a genuine misanthropist. Tough break, tough world, tough problems.

  5. #15
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    I didn't go into this to persuade; wanted to learn something new and that I did.

    I'm usually the silent observer and when I do speak on issues, I try to make it different. Don't really care what others do after, but I hope they learned a new issue at hand.

  6. #16
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    That's commendable, I also tried to get the most out of the topics for my presentations at school, and always chose the ones that seemed most interesting.

  7. #17
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    I should've done food waste, but as they say, things always look better in retrospect. I don't think I was the worst in the class though.

    Back on topic:
    Despite not liking the party, I do have to applaud Obama for being a man of his words. He is doing something (a lot of things) and I respect that.

    "President Obama's top aides huddled yesterday with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Democratic committee leaders to map out a strategy for cobbling together 60 votes on a comprehensive energy and climate change bill once lawmakers return next month from their spring break."

    Slow progress that could turn bad.

    "Ten Senate Democrats from coastal states warned in a letter released Thursday that they won't support a climate and energy bill if it permits a big expansion of drilling for offshore oil and natural gas."

    CLEAR Act S. 2877 ([URL="http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=s111-2877"]link[/URL])

    Seems to just be about carbon emission levels, offsets, and all that stuff.

  8. #18

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    All teams are encouraged to develop cost-effective new solutions to circuit protection. Lithium ion battery charger must be designed to have better performance, lower weight, faster loading times with longer battery efficient, and consistent reliability. and are believed to reach a speed of 3000 rpm in 3 to 5 seconds.

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