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Thread: Stuttering children seem to get better results

  1. #1

    Default Stuttering children seem to get better results

    We have noticed that many more of our children clients have improved their fluency than our adult clients. The reason , in my opinion is the age of the person relates to the age of the stutter problem. Habits are easier to quit when they are young, just the same as the stutter problem of a young person. You may read more about this opinion at:[URL="http://stutteringchildren.net"] http://stutteringchildren.net[/URL] Please give me your opinion. Laurikop

  2. #2
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    I think habit is too general of a term for this disorder. People use the word "stutter" as a catch all term for this disorder but there are different aspects of stuttering (i.e. everyone seems to stutter a little bit differently). Some have prolongation, some have repitition and some block. Each of those characteristics are caused by different habitual behaviors such as shallow breathing, hard articulatory pressure, tense jaw, mouth, and throat, etc.) . Each of the aforementioned stuttering behaviors are created by different physical factors. What triggers those factors may be linked to similar situations that you have experienced in the past which has a variable emotional response associated with them. Stress also aggravates the situation which is caused by triggering the fight or flight response. As adults, you tend to jump to conclusions about situations (e.g. everyone's is thinking I am fool if I stutter, etc.) which also plays a role. Along with environmental cues, I do believe there is a genetic aspect to it as well where PWS have a predisposition to the situation (I am not intending to say with this point that you are doomed to stutter based on heredity). All the aformention attributes contribute to the output of stuttering. I think you are correct children have less baggage than adults which make it easier to treat but there are plenty of children that are treated using different approaches (precision fluency, speech modification, psychotherapy, etc.) that continue to stutter. I am an adult of 37 and I just attended an intensive precision fluency program for the first time and I have been happy with the results for me (and I can tell you that I have quite a bit of baggage). What I saw with the class that I was at that one's attitude also plays a role. I have a lot of determination and practiced with a great degree of intensity while a few (not everyone) was there at someone else's request and they just didn't seem like that were interested in trying it at all. This is a topic where many people have different opinions on this subject but in general, I think you have to approach adults a bit differently than children because of the emotional/psychological aspect that occurs in adults that may not be as strong as children. If you apply a one size fits all approach to this disorder, this will skew your results and interpretation. Just my $0.02.

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    Studies are showing that the early that intervention happens then the higher the chances are of a child recovering. Stuttering is not a habit though that one can simply change. You have to intervene early as the brain is wiring itself for communication and in a sense try to rewire on the fly and shape the outcome. Try that generally for the very young child that treatment s purely speech-based as they have not had a lot of exposure to negative peer and social interactions as opposed to adulta who perhaps the speech issue is not the major problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grantm View Post
    Studies are showing that the early that intervention happens then the higher the chances are of a child recovering. Stuttering is not a habit though that one can simply change. You have to intervene early as the brain is wiring itself for communication and in a sense try to rewire on the fly and shape the outcome. Try that generally for the very young child that treatment s purely speech-based as they have not had a lot of exposure to negative peer and social interactions as opposed to adulta who perhaps the speech issue is not the major problem.
    I agree with your response, Grant. I guess for me what I struggle with is the word "habit" when it comes to a child development. The intervention is related to showing the correct the way to perform a certain task and at that point is not a habit; it is equivalent to a child trying to walk and falling down. It is really just trial and error at that point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grantm View Post
    Studies are showing that the early that intervention happens then the higher the chances are of a child recovering. .
    Do you know how these studies are conducted? Do you have a link to one? I imagine it'd be hard to control for selection biases when studying that sort of thing.

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    Not off my head but if you have a chance look for studies conducted with the Lidcombe Program in Australia. Looks for names like Mark Onslow, Ann Packman, Sue O'Brien and a few others. If I remember in the morning I will have a look. Studies are still being conducted long term now. Australia is the world leader on treatment, well-being and many other fields of research involving PWS

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    Quote Originally Posted by drederick View Post
    Do you know how these studies are conducted? Do you have a link to one? I imagine it'd be hard to control for selection biases when studying that sort of thing.
    This has been the case in America for as long as I can remember. Most kids overcome the stutter through speech pathology in their childhood.

    Does not answer why 1% of adults stutter in America.

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    With me, I was treated with speech pathology as a child(vigorously) and I still continued to stutter into my adulthood...

    So I agree with your progressing into adulthood idea.


    Quote Originally Posted by sang View Post
    I do wish that my parents had taken me to speech therapy when I was a kid, during the initial onset of stuttering, I think I would have been in better control of my Stuttering.

    I do think that the 1% of adults is a results of either the stuttering not being treated at an early age or it progressed into adulthood.

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