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Thread: Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

  1. #1
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    Default Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

    After reading [1] I decided to try it and see the results. I've been taking thiamine for a month now and so far I think I'm seeing some improvement, the blocks are easier to overcome. I started taking thiamine when I was going through a bad period in my stuttering. However I'm still a bit unsure if this is really effective or if I'm experiencing a placebo effect.

    This is just an hypothesis, but I guess thiamine is helping lowering my anxiety levels and that helps me not to stutter as much.

    Is anyone also taking Thiamine (aka Vitamin B1), if yes, what kind of results did you experienced or are experiencing?

    [1] [url]http://stuttersense.blogspot.com/2011/03/thiamine-breakthrough-in-stuttering.html[/url]

    EDIT: As far as I know, there is no real evidence that supports that thiamine lowers the anxiety levels or that it helps with stuttering. Nevertheless, it doesn't hurt to give it a shot. While taking 21429% (300mg) of the recommended daily dose of thiamine makes me cringe, there studies that show that taking high doses of thiamine is generally safe.
    Last edited by upsilon; 12-18-2011 at 05:15 AM.

  2. #2
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    Here's a risk assessment done by the Food Standard Agency in UK.

    [url]http://www.food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/evm_thiamin.pdf[/url]

  3. #3
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    You may as well take eye of newt. It's not like thiamine is a mystery substance.

    Basically, you could give a set of stutterers injections with pig's vomit and half of them would show improvement after six weeks. Stutter is just like that. Always has been, always will be. If you want to do something about your stuttering, go to a therapist and start the hard work. If that therapist doesn't help you, find another one and start over.

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    Stuttering is so interesting on som many levels to me and so is "cure". I have met 2 people who once stuttered severely and after a moment of intervention they never did again to any diagnosable level. Neither spruce or try to profit from their methods either.

    1) One gentleman I met stuttered all the way through to early twenties and then decided not to. He focused really hard on his speech from a mechanical level and not long after he stopped and has never slipped back.

    2) A lady I once met did a single McGuire Programme course and practised for a while. Her stuttering totally disappeared and she does not even use technique any more.

    Now I say cure in the sense that they have no fear of their stuttering ever returning.

  5. #5

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    grant-I thought that a person who stutters will always stutter. A stutter's brain cannot be trained to not stutter. They can learn to control it but it will always be there.

    Did these people learn to use their techniques automatically, meaning they don't have to focus when speaking anymore? Or did they just stop stuttering?

    Either way it is inspiring to know that other stutters overcame their stutter. It makes me want to practice harder to get the same results

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkB View Post
    You may as well take eye of newt. It's not like thiamine is a mystery substance.

    Basically, you could give a set of stutterers injections with pig's vomit and half of them would show improvement after six weeks. Stutter is just like that. Always has been, always will be. If you want to do something about your stuttering, go to a therapist and start the hard work. If that therapist doesn't help you, find another one and start over.
    No need to be idiotic in your response. I'm not advocating the use of thiamine nor that is a cure. I'm doing my own experiment and was wondering if someone was also trying it. I just wanted to know what were the effects on my blockage time. Like I said, maybe I'm suffering the placebo effect, I will see that in a few months. I decided to try, because a very small study was done by Dr. Martin F. Schwartz of the The National Center For Stuttering.
    Last edited by upsilon; 12-19-2011 at 05:20 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by istutter View Post
    grant-I thought that a person who stutters will always stutter. A stutter's brain cannot be trained to not stutter. They can learn to control it but it will always be there.

    Did these people learn to use their techniques automatically, meaning they don't have to focus when speaking anymore? Or did they just stop stuttering?

    Either way it is inspiring to know that other stutters overcame their stutter. It makes me want to practice harder to get the same results
    Hmm is not sure if that will be true for all. What about late onset stuttering? Surely if the brain can be wired once it can be rewired again? What about the people who suddenly develop stuttering or it suddenly goes away?

    As mentioned because stuttering is so variable between individuals it is hard to say why it left these people. These people impress me because they do not go around boasting about it or trying to make a quick $. Simple one almost I guess willed it away and focused very hard on not stuttering. The other did a single fluency shaping course and baboom gone. I saw her pre-course video also and she was very marked. She now works as a marriage celebrant. Strange things can happen and the small glitch in the system that may be causing us to stutter perhaps can be influenced the other way

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    Quote Originally Posted by grantm View Post
    As mentioned because stuttering is so variable between individuals it is hard to say why it left these people. ... Simple one almost I guess willed it away and focused very hard on not stuttering. The other did a single fluency shaping course and baboom gone.
    As I understand it, stress levels can play a big role in stuttering. The cases where people stopped dramatically and permanently are few and far between, but could be explained by markedly dropped stress levels. In the literature on stuttering there was the case of the man who, after watching a TV programme on stuttering, himself stopped stuttering permanently. It may be that his worries about his speech kept his stress level high, and when he watched the programme it served as a release of his stresses, so lowering base-level tension to below his stuttering threshold.

    The guy who willed it away - well, his stuttering may not have been so severe anyway. He may have willed himself to speak slower and focused, so reducing the tension on his speaking system. The stuttering of some people is really very light - some only stutter a little on a few sounds; they don't have a big problem and never go to see a therapist, so we don't know much about them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nemo View Post

    The guy who willed it away - well, his stuttering may not have been so severe anyway. He may have willed himself to speak slower and focused, so reducing the tension on his speaking system. The stuttering of some people is really very light - some only stutter a little on a few sounds; they don't have a big problem and never go to see a therapist, so we don't know much about them.
    From what I understand his stuttering again was quite marked. He is a cousin of a family friend ans they all talk about it. From what I gather he focused really hard on pronounciation and mechanics. Which of course would have also reduced stress levels, anxiety etc. I have spoken to him and he speaks in my opinion "normal" in pace and mechanics. He is a very confident person and speaker now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grantm View Post
    From what I understand his stuttering again was quite marked. He is a cousin of a family friend ans they all talk about it. From what I gather he focused really hard on pronounciation and mechanics. Which of course would have also reduced stress levels, anxiety etc. I have spoken to him and he speaks in my opinion "normal" in pace and mechanics. He is a very confident person and speaker now.
    Thank you, Grant - very interesting. Another factor which Dr Martin Schwartz mentions as positively affecting the chances of real progress and cure is the intensity of the vocal fold muscle spasms which result in fold "freezing". Apparently the vocal fold freezing of some people is not as strong as with other PWSs. If Schwartz is correct, it could mean that, for some PWSs, it is somewhat easier to control their speech. Maybe this person falls in that lucky category.

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